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The Strength Running Podcast

The Strength Running Podcast is where Coach Jason Fitzgerald shares running advice for new and veteran runners who are passionate about getting stronger, preventing running injuries, and racing faster. Featuring guests like Olympian Nick Symmonds and New York Times best-selling author Shalane Flanagan, you’ll learn what it takes to run fast, stay healthy, and become a better runner.
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Now displaying: October, 2017
Oct 23, 2017

The best runners know when to get help and work together.

If you're a Lone Wolf, some things are inevitable:

  • Have a question? Prepare to spend hours going down the Google rabbit hole...
  • Feeling unmotivated? Sorry, you're on your own.
  • Not sure how to break through your plateau? Time to "try everything!"

But the runners who get the support, guidance, and camaraderie they need always seem to reach their goals.

Which one are you? 

Today, my friend Mario Fraioli is joining me on the podcast to help me answer your toughest questions and give you the support needed to reach new levels of performance.

Mario and I competed against each other in college (he always beat me) while he was at Stonehill and I was at Connecticut College.

After graduation, he dove headfirst into the running industry. Some of his notable achievements:

Today, his main project is The Morning Shakeout, a weekly newsletter of commentary and thoughts on running, culture, writing, and media.

Despite his coaching, writing, and training duties, Mario made time to help members of the Strength Running community with their running questions.

Oct 17, 2017

For a lot of runners, what started as a way to get in shape or lose a few pounds turns into a lifelong passion.

Soon, you're going on running retreats and flying across the country to run a marathon. What did we do with all of our free time before running?!

Alas, not every runner gets to experience a lifetime of running bliss.

Some of us over train, burn out, or get so injured that we simply give up. But I will not let that happen to you!

Instead, let's learn from lifelong competitors who are still running after decades of workouts, long runs, and races.

These are athletes that have discovered the secret to unlocking a lifetime of racing, trail runs, and workouts (in other words... a lifetime of FUN!).

And Jonathan Beverly interviewed 50 of them to help you run for decades.

In his new book Run Strong, Stay Hungry: 9 Keys to Staying in the Race, Jonathan Beverly discusses the universal principles that promote lifelong running.

He spoke with 50 "lifetime competitors" like:

  • Deena Kastor (American Record holder in the marathon and half-marathon)
  • Bill Rodgers (4x winner of the Boston Marathon)
  • Joan Benoit Samuelson (former marathon World Record holder)

But more importantly, he interviewed a lot of normal runners! Not just Olympians or previous Boston Marathon winners - but average runners who don't have elite genetics.

That's why this podcast episode is so important: it's what works for all runners - not just the best runners.

Oct 2, 2017

Last August, we witnessed the most electrifying track race in history at the World Championships: the women's 3,000m Steeplechase.

Before this race, no American woman had ever won a medal in the steeple at the World Championships.

Emma Coburn and Courtney Frerichs changed that with an historic 1-2 finish, decimating a field that included the current World Record holder and Olympic Champion.

This was also the first time any Americans had taken home both gold and silver at the World Champions or the Olympics in a race longer than 400m since the 1912 Olympics.

Both Emma and Courtney also ran faster than the existing American Record.

NBC Sports called the race "shocking."

Sports Illustrated described Courtney's effort "certainly one of the biggest surprises of the world championships."

And ESPN boldly proclaimed that this was one of the best races in the history of running.

I'll paraphrase ESPN:

Before this race, Courtney' fastest steeplechase time was 9:19. She beat that time by an enormous 15 seconds to win silver in 9:03.77. That's like scoring a hat trick in a World Cup soccer game after totaling only three goals all season.

No American had won a world title in steeplechase since 1952. No U.S. women had ever finished 1-2 in any world championship distance race. Track nerds -- why isn't there such a thing as a football nerd? -- are calling this the most thrilling race of the 2017 World Championships, and one of the greatest moments in American distance running history.

You sports fans can just call it amazing. Like a football game where -- nah, forget that. After a race like this, nobody cares about football.

A 15-second improvement? Over a race that's less than two miles long? INSANITY!

That kind of PR puts Courtney in the record books. She's now the 8th fastest woman to ever run the steeplechase.

Today you're going to hear directly from Courtney about this historic race.

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