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The Strength Running Podcast

Coach Jason Fitzgerald shares running advice for new and veteran runners who are passionate about getting stronger, preventing running injuries, and racing faster. Featuring guests like Olympians Nick Symmonds and Shalane Flanagan, best-selling authors Alex Hutchinson and Matt Fitzgerald, and other Physical Therapists, Sports Psychologists, and Coaches. You’ll learn what it takes to run fast, stay healthy, and become a better runner with practical no-nonsense advice.
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Now displaying: August, 2018
Aug 30, 2018

Most coaches - including myself - don't have the tools to discuss this serious issue. I have no personal experience or training with eating disorders in runners (though I have friends with disordered eating).

So I brought on someone who does: Annyck Besso.

The goals of this conversation are threefold:

  • Give coaches better tools to educate, help, and guide their runners with eating disorders
  • Open a dialogue among all runners and foster a healthy, productive conversation
  • Provide resources to those who might be suffering from any type of disordered eating

Annyck is a Registered Dietitian with expertise in the treatment of eating disorders in private and academic medical center environments. She has a Bachelors degree in nutrition and dietetics, a Master's degree in dietetics, and specialty training in approaches like Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Family Based Treatment (FBT), and Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT).

She's also quite the speedy runner, recently running 3:07 at the hot and humid Wisconsin Marathon.

Resources & Links from the show:

Thank you Annyck for coming on the podcast to share your expertise about the topic of eating disorders in runners. There are a lot of resources included that I hope all of our listeners will find helpful!

Aug 15, 2018

I'm not promoting running trails because they're beautiful. Or awe-inspiring. Or jaw-dropping. Though, that's certainly an added bonus!

Trail running is a welcomed alternative to road running because it's a different type of stress that helps you become a better runner:

  • The uneven surface can limit the repetition of running, thereby reducing your injury risk
  • The varying terrain and obstacles (rocks, roots, holes, more turns and elevation changes) requires more athleticism
  • Softer surfaces can promote recovery on easy days

Plus, let's not forget that running trails usually means that you're going to run slower. And that can actually be a very good thing!

When used appropriately, train running can aid recovery by forcing you to run slower. A lower heart rate - on a softer, more forgiving surface - is how to structure a great recovery day.

From injury prevention to athleticism to recovery, trail running can help improve the quality of your training (and your race results).

To help you make the most of running trails - and get started with the least amount of stress - I spoke with trail and ultra runner Doug Hay.

Doug is the coach behind the Rock Creek Runner blog and podcast (Trail Talk). For a healthy dose of #trailporn, don't miss his Instagram!

He's also the creator of the Trail Runner's System (today's sponsor).

Our conversation covers a lot:

  • Our best advice for new trail runners
  • Do trails make running easier?
  • How "trails" can be a lot more than just trails
  • The risks of road running
  • Trail running as a gateway drug
  • What trail gear is absolutely necessary (and what isn't)?

We also include a challenge for you - so don't miss this episode.

Aug 9, 2018

Dr. Ryan Smith is a lead instructor for the Institute of Clinical Excellence in the Fitness Athlete division. He specializes in treating individuals who participate in CrossFit, Olympic Lifting, powerlifting, and other recreational sports like running.

He also specializes in pelvic health therapy, utilizing an external approach that focuses on education and management of diastisis recti, pelvic organ prolapse, and post-partum issues.

Ryan is an avid supporter of the Senior Rehab Project and promoting individuals to strength train throughout their lifetime.

You might recognize his name - he contributed to an earlier article on bodyweight strength training for runners.

And I'm excited to introduce a longer discussion with Ryan on many related topics:

  • The common movement dysfunctions among runners (and how to address them)
  • Should you worry about a "clicky" hip or knee?
  • What are "movement vital signs?"
  • How to use pain science to improve your running

Enjoy my conversation with Dr. Ryan Smith!

Show Links & Resources:

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