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The Strength Running Podcast

Coach Jason Fitzgerald shares running advice for new and veteran runners who are passionate about getting stronger, preventing running injuries, and racing faster. Featuring guests like Olympians Nick Symmonds and Shalane Flanagan, best-selling authors Alex Hutchinson and Matt Fitzgerald, and other Physical Therapists, Sports Psychologists, and Coaches. You’ll learn what it takes to run fast, stay healthy, and become a better runner with practical no-nonsense advice.
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Now displaying: February, 2019
Feb 28, 2019

Running nutrition can be confusing.

To begin with, there’s your day-to-day diet. The debates will forever rage on in running circles on how to fuel your training, from keto to high carb to whole 30 and everything in between.

At the end of the day, simple whole foods are your best bet, not following specific, restrictive rules on quantity and substance.

On top of that, there’s a general sense that running means you need “extras” in your diet. Extra iron, extra protein, extra…. fill in the blank.

Runners frequently turn to supplements to satisfy these “needs.” There are thousands of articles and blog posts, not to mention advertising, dedicated to convincing you that as a runner, you need to add specific nutrients to your diet.

This episode discusses what's needed (and what you can skip) and how to dial in your nutrition for better running performance.

Feb 19, 2019

Beth Skwarecki is the author of two books and the Health Editor of Lifehacker. She's here to dispel fitness and health myths that might be leading us astray.

Beth is a member of the National Association of Science Writers and the Association of Health Care Journalists. After getting a BA in biology from Alfred University, she received her Master's in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from Rutger's University.

She also has previously taught nutrition and environmental sciences at the Community College of Allegheny County.

Her two books will interest the science nerds out there:

This conversation focuses on the many side aspects of a healthy lifestyle that make running easier.

After all, it's critical to have a lifestyle that supports running. You can't train well if you barely sleep and drink a lot...

We're talking about:

  • DNA trivia for runners
  • How her job has changed her outlook on health and fitness
  • How to engineer a less groggy morning (for the morning runners out there!)
  • Whether elderberry supplements are a waste of money

Beth and I also discuss running in the dark, the cutoff point for running in extreme cold, and the warning signs of frostbite.

Feb 14, 2019

Lindsey has always been a runner. She ran cross country in high school and after running for fitness and health in college, started running marathons post-collegiately.

To date, she's run 14 marathons and is currently preparing for the 2019 Boston Marathon. She's also a RRCA-certified running coach.

Her podcast is one of the most popular running podcasts out there: I'll Have Another with Lindsey Hein has more than 160 episodes and features the most talented runners on the planet:

Lindsey is in a unique situation after being able to explore the training, lives, mindsets, and careers of so many world-class athletes. I couldn't help but have so many questions:

  • How do we relate to elite runners who have physical gifts that we simply do not?
  • What separates the best from the rest of us?
  • How do we learn from these runners to enhance our own training?

In our latest episode for the Strength Running Podcast, we discuss the drawbacks and opportunities of interviewing elite runners, mindset shifts related to running when you start having kids, and a lot more.

Feb 4, 2019

Recovery means much more than what you do - it's also about what you don't do.

For example, many runners think foam rolling or taking an ice bath are effective recovery methods. And if you enjoy them, I won't argue! But what you're not doing is equally important:

  • Are you using your day off from running to do your own taxes and run 34 errands?
  • Did you plan your big (i.e., stressful) family vacation for your post-marathon recovery week?
  • Do you stay out late enjoying one or several too many adult beverages?

If the answer is yes, then it almost doesn't matter what you do for your post workout recovery.

Because the addition of stress - whether physical or mental - derails our best recovery efforts. That's why when I was in college, our track coach was very understanding of poor workout splits during mid-terms. You simply can't perform physically and mentally at a high level for very long.

We previously discussed a hierarchy of injury prevention strategies and how some tactics are far more effective than others. The same is true for recovery strategies.

I want you to understand the best, most productive, and effective ways to recover from your hardest workouts.

And I'm thrilled to present you with today's podcast episode with Ms Christie Aschwanden.

Christie is the lead science writer for FiveThirtyEight and a former health columnist for the Washington Post. She's also a finalist for the National Magazine Award and her work has been featured in DiscoverSmithsonian, and O, The Oprah Magazine.

A fellow Coloradan like myself, Christie was a high school state champion in the 1,6000m run, a national collegiate cycling champion, and an elite cross-country skier with Team Rossignol.

Her new book is Good to Go: What The Athlete in All of Us Can Learn From the Strange Science of Recovery.

She's on the podcast to discuss individual post workout recovery strategies but also the bigger questions:

  • How do we know if we're fooling ourselves that something is working (when it isn't)?
  • Why isn't it enough to simply ask, "Does this recovery method work?"
  • Overall, have we made recovery too complicated?
  • How do you prioritize mental recovery?
  • If you were to speak to the entire Olympic Team about recovery, what would you say?

This episode is an excerpt of my full conversation with Christie for the Team Strength Running group coaching program.

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